What is your statistical decision

Question 1

Do parents with more children travel more than parents of small families? To find out, a survey was done of a large number of adults. Respondents were asked how many children they had and how many times per year they travelled. The frequencies of each answer were counted and recorded in the chart here. Conduct the appropriate test, with alpha - 0.001, to determine if the amount of travel is related to the size of family.


                       Amount of travel per year




Number of Children

One or less

Twice

Three times or more


0


103

63


86


1


121

86


110


2


108

83


78


3


83

91


105


4


65

67


83


more than 4


68

83


90


Question 2:

A sociologist wants to find out if people's religious attitudes are connected somehow to their political orientation. So a survey is done asking people whether or not they are religious, and measuring their political beliefs on the "Likert" scale, which assigns a number from 1-7 to people to place them on a "left-right" spectrum. The results are listed in the following table. Is there a difference between religious and non-religious peoples politics? What is your statistical decision at the 0.05 alpha level, and what is your conclusion?

Non- Religious

Religious

4

4

4

2

5

5

5

6

5

5

3

4

5

2

4

4

4

6

2

4

4

5

5

5

2

4

4

4

6

6

4

5

6

3

3

4

4

3

5

5

Question 3:

The argument against gun control seems to rely on a fear of violent crime. Bt is that fear different in the US and Canada? A survey is done asking a small sample of residents of each country about how much they feel vulnerable to vioment crime, on a scale of 1 to 10. The answers are listed below. Using alpha= 0.05, run a t-test on the data below to see if there is a difference in the overall level of fear in the two countries. Indicate the null and alternative hypothesis and the critical t-value. What is your statistical decision? What is your conclusion?

Canada

USA

2

0

5

1

1

 

1

1

1

4

2

 

6

3

6

1

 

 

1

2

2

2

 

 

Question 4:

Are people of different socio-economic status more likely to be imprisoned? The adult. Working, population of the country is found from available statistics composed of the following four groups: 12 % unemployed, 42% employed workers, 35% professional/managerial and 11% large business owners. A sample of the population of people living in prisons finds the following distribution of the sample four groups, counted as previous status:

Unemployed

Employed workers

Professional/managerial

Large business owners

73

161

87

2

At alpha, 0.05 test the hypothesis of people imprisoned has as similar socio-economic composition as the general population.

Question 5:

A survey conducted among 12 individuals randomly selected from across the country indicated that individuals watched television, on average, 18.75 hours per week, with SS1= 411.25. A researcher wants to find out if teenagers watch television for the same number of hours each week. Another random sample of 15 teenagers is surveyed to find out their TV habits. The results show that these teenagers watch an average of 19.5 hours per week, with SS2= 609.5. Test the hypothesis at alpha= 0.02. Is there a difference?

 

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